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No. 165: The importance of Villum Research Station for the Danish atmospheric AMAP contributions. Danish contribution to AMAP atmospheric part

Skov, H., Bossi, R., Christensen, J., Vorkamp, K., Massling, A., Nøjgaard, J.K., Kaj Mantzius Hansen, Im, U. & Sørensen, L.L. 2020. The importance of Villum Research Station for the Danish atmospheric AMAP contributions. Danish contribution to AMAP atmospheric part. Aarhus University, DCE – Danish Centre for Environment and Energy, 26 pp. Technical Report No. 165. http://dce2.au.dk/pub/TR165.pdf

Summary

Arctic is a sentinel for global climate changes. Human activities have a strong impact on the global climate and thus also for the Arctic. Climatic teleconnections (e.g. ocean currents as the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic Current, as well as weather patterns) gives feedback on the global climate and environment and make the changes relevant not only for the Arctic but for the entire world. A temperature increase in Arctic double as high as the average of the rest of the world together with more human activities highlight the urgency to understand the present dynamics of pollutants in Arctic to assess their effects.

The aim of this report is to describe the role of Villum Research Station (Villum), at Station Nord in North Greenland in contributing to the knowledge about climate and contaminant loads to the Arctic environment and in particular to Greenland. The report will address the importance of Villum for de-scribing the atmospheric transport pathways and dynamics for different contaminant groups and issues prioritised by AMAP.

We will show that the results obtained at Villum are very important for assessing the impact of changing sources and processes controlling the contaminant load to Arctic and how short lived climate forcers interact with climate. Furthermore, we will list examples of the use of measured values at the station and results obtained by different types of atmospheric models. The combination of measurements and model results gives us the ability to understand the causes of present concentration levels. This knowledge makes it possible to predict future levels and source/receptor relationships.